DIY Repairs

Mechanics now-a-days charge prices that fall just a little short of extortion and it is about time you armed yourself with some knowledge of how to do the simpler things by yourself. Some repairs will inevitably send you to a mechanic but there are many repairs that you can manage with a little guidance and much less money than a mechanic will demand.

Fuel filter replacement

The average car will require a new fuel filter after being driven for about 10,000 miles. When an oil filter gets dirty and clogged, it reduces an engine’s efficiency and might significantly reduce the power output of an engine. When it gets too dirty, it might reach a point where the engine fails to start. The filter should therefore be replaced regularly. To replace an oil filter, you should start by disconnecting the battery and releasing fuel line pressure. Disconnect the fuel line from the old filter and remove the filter. Replace the washers and then connect the new filter. Make sure that all the steps have been followed and start the car to check for fuel leakage.

Replacing brake pads

Brake pads can easily be replaced by any person with basic tools. It is important because brakes are important for your safety on the road and they can damage other expensive parts when they wear too thin. You need a jack, c-clamp, socket set, and lug nut wrench. The process entails lifting the jar, removing the wheel, opening the brake calipers, and replacing the pads. Brake pad recycling is available in some states.

Windshield repair

It is very easy to repair windshields that suffer from star chips with few or no cracks at home. There are many windshield repair kits for DIY enthusiasts that can be bought at auto stores. The first step is to clean an area around the damaged part of the windshield with glass cleaner. Smoothen the damaged area with a razor blade and make sure that you clean out any loose glass. Inject adhesive into the windshield. Don’t carry out the procedure in direct sunlight as the adhesive will dry too quickly and the finish will not be clear.

Power steering flush

When you go to a mechanic to have a power steering flushed, it would cost between $30 and $100. This does not sound like too much until you consider the fact that you can do it at home for about $5. All you need for this process is a turkey baster. Use the turkey baster to siphon as much oil as you can from the canister located in the engine bay and keep it safely for transport to a recycling plant. Pour the new fluid into the container and you’re good to go as soon as you return it to its position.

Apart from these minor repairs, you can conduct most of the repairs done during a routine service visit at the comfort of your home. With enough experience, you might no longer have to take the car for routine maintenance after 3,000 miles. This way you can save money for emergency car repairs and extensive repairs that are required after about 60,000 miles.